Register  |   |   |  Calendar  |  Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
BigDogLover19

Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #1 
                As many of you know, I recently adopted Martin from a shelter. She is a couple of years old and was in good health when I picked her up. Luckily, she has adapted very well to her new surroundings and has fit in with our family like a charm. I am a bit worried now, however. She has been taking an extra couple seconds to get up from a laying position and I have even noticed a little limp for the first few minutes. I read that this may be a sign of hip dysplasia. We have an appt with the vet this week to check her out, but I was wondering if anyone here has ever dealt with that and would be willing to share some insight or tips on rehab? Thanks!

June & Martin
0
brandypup

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 159
Reply with quote  #2 

(((hugs))) Hope she is ok. Is her weight good?


__________________
Boomer Beagle, Gatorbait Chihuahua Stewie. Cats-GG, Pisces, Zodie, Butterball, Dolly.


0
karably

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 955
Reply with quote  #3 
Hope she is ok.  It could be a sign of hip dysplasia or early arthritis.  Since you posted this in September, your vet may have given you some feedback by now.  At any rate, I would start her on a glucosamine supplement.  Hopefully, your vet has recommended this as a first step, as it can often postpone having to begin anti-inflammatories.  
__________________
Karen K.
http://www.MastiffsVonHimmel.com
0
Fgbarry

Registered:
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #4 
My 9 year old male has weak hind end. Struggling to rise. Rear legs have always been weak. Worse now with age. Any suggestions?
__________________
Fred Barry
0
brandypup

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 159
Reply with quote  #5 
Well Fgbarry, I do not have a mastifff yet but I can tell you some basics. First of course is have a good vet. They are still your best bet. But you can also keep the weight down, and have a good diet with out allot of grains which can aggravate joints. A couple good supplements are important also. Good luck. 
__________________
Boomer Beagle, Gatorbait Chihuahua Stewie. Cats-GG, Pisces, Zodie, Butterball, Dolly.


0
treeNsea

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #6 

Another symptom of hip dysplasia is exercise intolerance and having trouble maneuvering on right turns and/or right about turns (e.g. turning in corners). I've had old dogs with trouble getting up, but they had arthritis in the spine (where the loin connects to the pelvis).


__________________
Maria Jensen
treeNsea Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs & Mastiffs
http://www.treeNseaGreaterSwiss.com
0
steveoifer

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 9,230
Reply with quote  #7 

A Number of Environmental Factors Can Affect the Incidence of Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

ScienceDaily (Mar. 26, 2012) — Hip dysplasia (HD) in dogs is affected to a larger degree than previously believed by the environment in which puppies grow up. It is particularly during the period from birth to three months that various environmental factors appear to influence the development of this disease. During the puppy stage, preventive measures can therefore be recommended with a view to giving dogs disposed to the condition a better quality of life.


Randi I. Krontveit's doctoral research has studied the incidence of HD in four breeds of dog in Norway and examined factors in the environment where the dogs grew up that can have an affect on the number of cases. HD is a genetic disease which also occurs in several other species. Dogs are not born with HD, but genetically disposed puppies can develop varying degrees of HD. The degree of HD has an affect on when the dogs show symptoms and on how long they live.

Five hundred privately owned dogs participated in the study and the four breeds investigated were the Newfoundland, the Labrador Retriever, the Leonberger and the Irish Wolfhound. The environment in which the dogs were born and grew up was registered by means of questionnaires filled out by the breeder and the new owner, and by examinations carried out by veterinary surgeons.

Findings from previous experiments and studies from other countries have indicated that rapid growth and a high body weight are factors that increase the likelihood of developing HD. Randi I. Krontveit's research has shown that rapid growth and high body weight in the first year of the puppies' life did not result in an increased risk of HD. On the contrary, she found that the breed that had the slowest growth rate -- the Newfoundland -- had the highest incidence of HD (36%). The Irish Wolfhound had the lowest incidence of HD (10%), yet had the fastest rate of growth.

Puppies usually live with their mother at the breeder's for the first eight weeks of their life. Several factors related to the living conditions at the breeder's were shown to have an influence on the incidence of HD. Puppies born in the spring or summer and at breeders who lived on a farm or small holding, had a lower risk of developing HD. After about eight weeks, the puppies began life with their new owner. The opportunity to exercise daily in parks up until the age of three months reduced the risk of HD, whereas the daily use of steps during the same period increased the risk. Overall, it would appear that daily exercise out in gently undulating terrain up until the age of three months gives a good prognosis when it comes to preventing HD.

The dogs in this study were followed up until they reached 10 years of age by means of annual questionnaires filled out by the owner. Dogs seriously affected by HD were put down earlier than dogs with a milder form of the disease. This was particularly the case for Newfoundlands and Leonbergers. HD did not have such a large affect on the longevity of Labrador Retrievers or Irish Wolfhounds. Serious and moderate degrees of HD increased the risk of symptoms such as limping and hip pain and these symptoms occurred earliest in Newfoundlands. The Labrador Retriever was the breed in which symptoms appeared latest in life. Varied exercise had a positive effect and dogs that exercised on a daily basis on a lead and running free in different types of terrain were free of symptoms longer than dogs that were less active.

Based on the findings of this doctoral research, preventive measures related to early canine life can be recommended. If HD in its most serious forms can be prevented, the life quality of dogs will be improved.


__________________
For the betterment of the breed

"Above all, a uniform type should be aimed at by breeders and uniformity of type can only exist in a proportionate ratio in the purity and distinctiveness in any breed"!.........M. Moore
"If breeds did not adhere to a specific shape, form, and colour range, or if breeders disregarded this blueprint, the breed would degenerate to the point that it would hardly resemble the breed at all. Selective breeding does not just create breeds- it preserves them as well." Breeding purebred dogs inherently means accepting limitations on your freedom to just breed anything...Catherine McMillan
" A reinforced consolidation of the American and British standards could be the basis for restoring our breed to the gladiatorial glory of its ancient past, in capability if not in usage".....Norman Howard Carp-Gordon
"I can live with doubt, or not knowing, rather than to have answers that might be wrong"...Richard Feynman
0
Martyna

Registered:
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #8 
regarding the dysplasia, i think the most important thing is to know which type of dysplasia your dog might have. her are few tips which can help: http://2puppies.com/articles-about-dogs/dysplasia/ only then you can decide what treatment you can apply to the dog... have a lot of experience on healing the dogs, so feel free to ask.
__________________
http://www.2puppies.com
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.


THANK YOU FOR VISITING OUR BOARD!!