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Reply with quote  #1 
We chat a lot about mastiff maturity with regard to the physical attributes but what about their temperaments and personalities?

What changes have you noticed from say 1 year old - 2.5 years old?

I am noticing for the first time (at 31 months) that Monty is all of a sudden enjoying the hose and chasing the water, he loves it.  Wanting nothing do to with it until now.  Go figure.

Ophelia is a bit more bossy with our Chis lately - she's coming up on 16 months.

When do the full temperaments set in, or do they? 

We put a lot into our pups and of course hopefully continue but is there an age after 1 year where things are still really changing?

When can we expect the full personality to be set, or can we?

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Jademmastiffs

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Reply with quote  #2 

With my boys, I notice that they seem to really come into their selfs and personalities at about 18-20mo. The girls seem to take a bit longer, around two I would say with my girls.


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Beth

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Reply with quote  #3 
Interesting topic. This is why IMO the AKC CGC should not be given at such a young age (I think you can take it at 6 months or even younger) Crazy! Rare that such a young puppy would have temperment issues, no?



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Nicci

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Reply with quote  #4 

Cooper at 12-18 months was full of himself and very studly.  Played too rough and thought he was the big man on campus but by 2 he was a mellow goofball.  Now with girls I don't know yet.  Cass is only almost 14 months and just having her first heat.  We see if anything changes. 


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mckemie

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Reply with quote  #5 
Oh, I like this topic!

My boy has always been my "hyper mastiff" and as he closes in on 5 years, he still is!  He scares me sometimes, as I'm worried he's going to hurt himself, but I let him do whatever he enjoys in the safety of the yard.

My Chocolate as settled more completely into her role as the Supreme Diva of This and All Other Universes For All Eternity....or something like that.  She's become a little more playful than she used to be, but is most comfortable surveying her Kingdom rather than roughhousing through it!  And this has always been the case, she's simply refined her technique with age.

Can't wait to see what Amara does
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lamars

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Reply with quote  #6 
I would say anywhere from 1 to 18 months is when males hormones kick in and they become punks. I think maturity is around 3 years old at 2 they can still be macho. Jimmy did not settle down til 3. They are all different but after 1 is when you will notice a change good news they usually grow out of it. Girls do take longer of heats make a difference in their attitudes other than that after 2 for them also before they start mellowing out. IF they are going to..:-)

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Reply with quote  #7 
Zahar was a sweet mellow pussy cat from the time he was eight weeks old, that has never changed. He was never a hyper active puppy. Now he is almost three and is the sweet mellow, lay around, and pretty much do nothing but suck on his woobie boy! LOL (he's a total momma's boy though and has to be in EVERY room with me, including the damn bathroom!)

Sirius was also never hyper, pretty mellow and by far the smartest and easiest one to train from eight weeks on. He is almost six and is still real mellow and pretty easy going (as long as he doesnt get a glimpse of Zahar) then he just turns into a pure ass!

Amir was a pretty playful happy puppy, he went through his major nutso stage at about nine months, he is now almost eighteen months and for the past three months or so his true colors have been coming through and he is well the class clown! He LOVES his people and LOVES to play with us, but he is so soft and sweet about it. When he's outside his own "domain" he is really laid back care free, go with the flow kinda kid! We get a big kick out of him!

Then there's Xavier...aka "Hellboy" and well the verdict is still out on him! LOL
He is almost a year old and is still so dang hyper, obnoxious, crazy, and a major pain in my ass!!! He's cute though!!!

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gentlegiant

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beth
Interesting topic. This is why IMO the AKC CGC should not be given at such a young age (I think you can take it at 6 months or even younger) Crazy! Rare that such a young puppy would have temperment issues, no?




I will add to this Beth, if you don't mind...:-)

I agree with what you said...in fact I think they should be retested every 1-2 years, just....because :-)

The CGC is not so much a temperament test, as an obedience test, but still, if you stop working with your dog regularly, they sometimes are not as sharp as they were fresh out of obedience school/training....Same with the American Temperament Test Society (ATTS/TT)...I heard my evaluator suggest to alot of people to retest regularly, as the temperament can change, and I agree with him too....

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks for the input everyone!

I have a question.

So, you've raised a pup with another dog (not its own breed) or maybe a cat from 8 weeks on up and suddenly at 18 months that dog starts picking on or being dominate over the cat or other smaller dog...What does this mean?

I've seen my mastiffs mature within in their pack and have issues and need to find their way.  Should a smaller dog or say a cat be considered "part of the pack?"  If something negative starts happening should it be viewed the same way as it would be if it were mastiff to mastiff, even if its with a much smaller dog or the family cat?
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augusta

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Reply with quote  #10 
hi,

during the teenage years, intact males have 10 times the testosterone that they will have as adults.  testosterone is the aggression hormone so behavior changes, even if not any sort of aggression, would be expected.

there is less known about the affect of hormones on female behavior, but we all know how teenage girls are (eyeroll) and again, behavior changes would be expected.

without a traumatic event that changes a life, dogs mature when their hormones adjust and their bodies adjust to their hormones.

i haven't gotten that far but i think scott and fuller go into it, when i find the book i'll look.

"at 18 months that dog starts picking on or being dominate over the cat or other smaller dog...What does this mean?"

describe the behavior.

v

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hey v.

I started this thread in general as I have many who are coming into full maturity and am seeing some changes as they do this - not necessarily negative, some really fun.  But am seeing some changes so I was curious about the different ages/stages.  I also thought it would be a good topic.

With that said, I will share a "situation," if you can even call it that that I am a bit perplexed by.

All our mastiffs were "raised" so to speak, by our Chis.  Both are neutered males.  One is particularly dominant to the extent that he will boss, even snap at their jowls when trying to "herd" them.  Since he's been doing this since they were 8 weeks old, they have never batted an eye and still do not.  He is also very loving, cleans eyes, jowls, faces and they love his doting over them.  They have a great deal of respect for him.

Well, he did this to O the other day and she decided it wasn't okay and gave him a nip back.  He quickly cried wolf.  Ah ha, she says to herself....

She was already in a bit of fowl mood as she had been spending more time outside since I had moved the pups up into the office in their crate and am working on potty training and they are in the house.  She is very possessive over her space in the office under the desk.  #1, she was not allowed to go into that space, #2, I wasn't letter her into the house nearly as much.  She was on the porch and wanting in and basically pissed off the day this happened with the black Chi.

Later that evening she, without my knowledge, cornered the other chi - (fawn) not nearly as bossy and I don't know what happened but my neighbor heard him crying.  They were out at the gate.  She picked him up and he was wet....  O was out there, as were George and Dreamer.

She now views him as her "boy."  He is now terrified her her.  The black and chi and her - no problem although I have noticed that the black Chi is not so anxious to boss her around, but he's holding his own just fine.

Now that the fawn chi is afraid, its like everyone senses it, but O is acting on it by targeting him and following him when he's outside.  The more he is scared the more she follows him. 

So, she is by far one of the safest of my dogs with other dogs.  You could let her loose at a dog park and she'd have a ball, no dog aggression whatsoever.  Absolutely a dream with the other dogs here and people.  Most who come fall in love with her - she is a bit smaller in height and truly just as sweet as she can be, respectful of space, etc.  This is very isolated.  The difficult part is that if this were between her and another female mastiff, well I'd just separate, which I will and have done with the chi - they are only together when I am there.  But its baffling me because he's smaller - this the maturity thing.  Is this just a pack dominance deal as she is maturing and "size don't matter?"

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augusta

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Reply with quote  #12 
hi,

size is not relevant.  i've seen yorkies chase rotts away from the water bowl, westies herd mastiffs and chihuahua's move airedales off the couch.  the napolean dog exists(grin).

age is relevant.  pre-maturity dogs aren't "alpha" although they may bully other dogs their own age or younger or attempt to bully older dogs.

and that's also an important distinction - bullying/violence and true alpha behavior are quite different. 

i love this story for what it tells us:
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2000/08/22/60II/main226894.shtml

i'd be very careful.  from what you've said, i don't think she's confident enough to not continue to threaten.  that is stressful for all the dogs and her lack of confidence means she's not a true alpha.  i could be wrong about all of that though, so you need to listen to your dogs, not me(grin).

when dogs are confident, they make their move and it's over.  there might be some little maybe's from other dogs, but they are quickly squashed and that's it.  if the fawn chi is avoiding her, that's not a good sign.  and if her attacks are generalized, i.e. not over food, toys, etc. then that's also not a good sign.

it may be that her safe place is gone and that is stressing her - is there any way you can let her back under the desk?  is there anything else you can do to take the stress off her?

also - dogs at home are not always the same as dogs at the dog park.  while i am not a fan of pack theory, i don't deny they exist although usually not in the form most people think they do.  dogs often behave differently with pack members than they do with outsider dogs.

hormones, hormones, hormones...statistically there's a much greater chance of problems when dogs are close in age which is why i suggest that people wait a while before getting another puppy.  i've had exactly the opposite experience with my dogs, but statistically it's safer to spread them out.

v


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Reply with quote  #13 
Thanks so much v - you hit the nail on the head.  She is not the alpha and I do feel the reason she likes her area under the desk is because she feels safe there even tho she has never been offended at all by the other dogs - at least that I have noticed.  She is very playful and that could also be her way of making herself feel more comfortable in the pack environment.

I am absolutely monitoring the Chi situation.

Yes, she can have her desk spot back LOL and we'll see if that helps.  I did take away her routine by moving her from that spot which is where she's always been. 

Thanks for the lack of confidence part... it makes a ton of sense for her.  She has no fear or aggression at all - this is the first I've seen of anything negative and like other situations with multiple dogs - have to find a way to manage.



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augusta

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Reply with quote  #14 
hi,

as always i'm guessing, but your description was good and that helps to make the guess more likely.  i'd try to de-stress her and see how she does.

we are so used to stress we don't realize how much it affects species who are virtually not equipped to handle it and often we don't realize how much we are stressing them either - what seems like nothing to us can be very serious to them.  i've found that discovering what is stressful (sometimes not easy!) and eliminating that stress in the lives of my clients' dogs sometimes stops unwanted behaviors without anything else being done.

as they mature they often change.  my experience is that not much changed in any of my dogs (except fiona who had whacky heat cycles and tried to kill needy...sigh).  but i'm in the minority on that one.

v


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Harmony

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Reply with quote  #15 
Please note the discussion here and the dates surrounding the discussion - this is in regard to the post above on Ophelia that is pinned.  As you can see, I was beginning to see changes and having problems!  They continued to escalate and out of respect for the breeder I didn't go into depth on my descriptions and kept things light,but thanks to the harasser - now the entire story is out where everyone can read it.!!

This is a dog that went from being good with the other dogs to attempting to take them down at the neck one by one.

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acosmo29

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Reply with quote  #16 
Hi Everyone!
I am new to this forum

I am new to owning a dog and I have a lovely ten month old fawn male
he is wonderful and a lot of work
lately he has taken to mouthing and nipping people who are petting him
he has been exposed to hundreds of people since day one so I know it is not a socialization thing

have you experienced this/ and how to handle

he is not great lately with people in the house and outside is hot or miss with the jumping and mouthing






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